• History & Culture Resources

  • Find resources to learn about the local history, culture, topography, natural resources and transportation systems which depict the story of Garrett County's development as Maryland's Gateway to the West.

    Garrett County Historical Markers

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    Historical markers have been a familiar sight on Maryland's roadways for more than half a century. Launched in 1933, the roadside historical marker program has proven an effective way to draw attention to the many events, people and places that have contributed to the richness of our state and nation. The marker program is administered by the Maryland Historical Trust in cooperation with the Maryland State Highway Administration. MHT reviews marker proposals, finalizes the wording, recommends general locations for placement and funds purchase of new markers. SHA determines the best siting, installs and maintains the markers, and funds replacement markers.

  • Barn Quilts in Garrett County - Driving Tour

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    The Barn Quilt Association of Garrett County strives to provide a sustainable heritage tourism attraction/activity while preserving and celebrating the unique agriculture, history,and arts culture of our area through visual combinations of barns and quilt designs, to educate the public and showcase our Appalachian tradition. There are currently 40 barn quilts in Garrett County!

    See Barn Quilt locations on the map below:

  • Scenic Byways - Mountain Maryland and the National Road

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    Maryland’s 18 designated byways encompass 2,487 miles of beautiful roads and offer a taste of Maryland’s scenic beauty, history and culture. Take the roads less traveled - including a byway featuring a nationally significant theme: the Historic National Road

    If you’re planning a trip, try Maryland’s interactive tour map. You’ll find great suggestions for scenic or historic driving tours, Maryland Heritage areas, historic districts, parks, and other cultural and recreational destinations. Don’t forget that most scenic byways are also perfect for exploring by bicycle. You’ll find maps and safety information for bicycle-friendly routes here.

  • Coal Talks
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    The Coal Talk Oral History project includes stories and memories from Western Maryland coal communities. In Maryland’s two westernmost counties, Garrett and Allegany, coal mining families evolved a culture linking life above and below ground in towns that are now sometimes hard to find and in life underground that stretched from Maryland into West Virginia. The oral history project was directed by Dr. Gail N. Herman, assisted by Reverend John Grant. The project was sponsored in 1989-1993 by Garrett Recreation, Parks, and Tourism with partial funding from Garrett County Development Corporation. The Maryland Humanities Council assisted with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Coal Talk project is dedicated to preserving the memories and subtle nuances of life in the coal towns and mines of Western Maryland.

    For the entire audio of the interviews and for more information contact the librarian at Garrett College:

    Jennifer Butler
    Director of Library & Learning Commons
    687 Mosser Road
    McHenry, Maryland 21541

    Click to Contact Jennifer

  • Historic Garrett County Photography

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    Born in 1874 Leo Beachy was a schoolteacher and poet who at the age of thirty-one, turned to photography to express his love of the environment and his community. With dogged persistence he photographed the hillsides of western Maryland while teaching himself to see the extraordinary beauty of the world around him. These pictures taken between 1905 and 1927 are an expressive and eloquent window into Garrett County’s past and represent the life’s work of Leo J. Beachy.

    The photographs in the collection range from individual studio portraits to beautiful and expansive landscapes. This archive allows the entire community to share the visual, artistic and cultural heritage of Garrett County.

  • Cranesville Swamp

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    Cranesville Swamp is a boreal peat bog relic left behind from the Pleistocene Epoch. The swamp, a lush forest and wetland home to an exceptional variety of plants and animals, formed 15,000 years ago during the last Ice Age. This site was protected by The Nature Conservancy in stages, beginning in 1960. Since that time, the Conservancy has acquired more than 600 acres which will be held in trust in perpetuity.


     

  • Appalachian Forest Heritage Area

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    The Appalachian Forest Heritage Area is an effort to integrate central Appalachian forest history, culture, natural history, products, and forestry management into a heritage tourism initiative to promote rural community development.
     
    AFHA celebrates the central Appalachian forest -- its history, culture, natural history, forest management and products. This grassroots partnership works in West Virginia and western Maryland to explore the relationship between the Appalachian highlands forest and the people who live within it.